Department Chair: Mary Meyer

Department Purpose: Develop model citizens who contribute in positive ways to a democratic society in a complex and ever-changing world.


Social Studies
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Social Studies
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Social Studies
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Social Studies
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World History

Course Credit: 2

Course Description:

In this course sophomores will unlock the past to better understand the future of our world. From the study of ancient civilizations to the global events of the modern world, objectives of the class will focus on comprehending how events of today are rooted in the events of our world’s past.

Honors World Studies: History

Course Credit: 2(W)
Prerequisite: Grade of A in English 9 or B+ or higher in Honors English 9 and current English instructor recommendation

Course Description:

The interdisciplinary block-scheduled course is taken concurrently with Honors World Studies: Literature. Students will be exposed to an in-depth look at history and literature of the world from pre-history to modern time. The year long course devotes considerable time connecting and evaluating key historical information with major pieces of literature. In addition, students will connect to our current global community. Students are expected to apply and demonstrate unit themes as well as complete one Diversity Experience per quarter outside of class time.

American Studies

Course Credit: 4

Course Description:

American Studies is a rigorous, one year interdisciplinary block course designed for juniors taught jointly by American Literature and American History teachers. This course utilizes a thematic approach to study American culture from prehistory to the future. The units include “The American People, Immigration and Ethnic Heritage; The American Identity, The Colonial and Revolutionary Era; The West, American Independence and Individualism; The Civil War, Conflict and Conscience; American Industrialization, Man and Machine; Decades of Change, America Comes of Age; WWII and the Cold War, The Age of Conformity; Modern America, The Age of Diversity; and The Twenty-First Century.”

Honors American Studies

Course Credit: 4(W)
Prerequisite: Grade of A in World Literature or B+ or higher in Honors World Studies: Literature and current English instructor recommendation

Course Description:

Honors American Studies is a challenging one year interdisciplinary course designed for juniors taught by American History and American Literature teachers. In this block scheduled class, students will experience a thematic, in-depth study of American history, literature, and culture from the earliest Native Americans through the twenty-first century Americans of today. Students who register for this course should expect extensive reading and writing, with emphasis on higher level analytical skills. Students will read a number of major works of classic American literature in addition to reading that will be required in the American Studies history and literature textbooks. Each unit will also require students to devote time outside of class to individual and/or group projects.

American Government

Course Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Senior standing

Course Description:

American Government is a semester course in which students will gain an understanding of American government and political behavior that is essential for effective citizenship and active involvement in a democratic American society. Students will examine the historical and philosophical foundations of our country’s ideas about constitutional government, creation of the Constitution, organizing of the national government, development of the Constitution, meaning of various rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights, expansion of rights during the last two hundred years, and roles of citizens in American democracy. Students will be required to participate in a simulated Congressional Hearing as the final assessment.

AP United States Government and Politics

Course Credit: 1(W)
Prerequisite: Grade of A in American Studies or B+ or higher in Honors American Studies and current History instructor recommendation

Course Description:

This is a college level course designed to give a comprehensive understanding of government and politics in the United States. The course will include the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and the analysis of specific examples. It will require the familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. government, and politics. Students will be given the opportunity to take the Advance Placement exam in May to earn collegiate credit.

Living as a Disciple of Jesus Christ in Society

Course Credit: 2

Course Description:

During this second semester course, all seniors will explore the relationship between government, economics, and Catholic Church teachings. This interdisciplinary course will explore various political, economic, and social issues encompassing our world today, from both a civic and religious perspective. Basic themes include political equity, poverty, violence, and consumerism. Seniors will analyze principles of the American government and economic system and examine the Catholic Church’s teachings so they may become informed and active citizens with a Catholic moral conscience.

Psychology

Course Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing (Students who have taken AP Psychology are not eligible to take this class.)

Course Description:

This is an introduction to memory, personality, behavior, thought, history of psychology, and careers in the field. Students will study the major schools of thought which include Freudian, behaviorist, and humanistic. Students should be prepared to use the scientific methods of hypothesis, procedure, data, conclusion, and evaluation.

AP Psychology

Course Credit: 2(W)
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and instructor recommendation

Course Description:

The purpose of Advanced Placement Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. In this year long course, the students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields of psychology. Students will also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This course can be taken for dual enrollment credit through UNO; students who elect to take this course for college credit are responsible for paying tuition and all applicable fees.

Sociology

Course Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

Course Description:

Sociology is the study of society and of the interactions within society’s many groups. Students in this class will learn about social development of individuals in a society and consider the effects culture, language, and status have on development. They will analyze social institutions, examine contemporary social problems, and develop an understanding of the characteristics of social interaction in our complex modern society.

AP United States History

Course Credit: 2(W)
Prerequisite: Senior standing, grade of A in American Studies or B+ or higher in Honors American Studies and instructor recommendation

Course Description:

This course is designed to prepare students to earn college credit by rigorously preparing them for the Advanced Placement exam. The text, content, and pacing of this class resemble those of a first year college class in United States History. Students are strongly encouraged to take the Advanced Placement exam in United States History at the conclusion of the course.

Current Issues and Trends

Course Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

Course Description:

This course addresses current events on the local, state, national, and international levels while focusing on analysis, discussion, and research. The class studies issues in politics, society, and the economy. Students will perform research, analyze sources, identify biases, write papers, and participate in graded discussions. A lab fee will be charged for materials.

Geography

Course Credit: 1

Course Description:

During this semester course, students will learn the basic skills, tools, and orientations of geographers. Students will analyze the relationship between the physical environment and the ways we live, think, behave, and work. These objectives will be met by studying the seven continents using a thematic approach. Students will also make connections to current issues in World Geography as it relates to weather, topography, and location.

Sports and Leisure Activities in American History

Course Credit: 1

Course Description:

This is a one semester elective course that examines the influences and effects of leisure activities and competitive sports on the history of our nation. In this course, students will begin their studies with pre-Colonial North American sports and move through the timeline of American history to the 21st century. Topics to be covered will be the origin and expansion of mainstream sports; influences of politics, race, and gender on sports; the influences of technology, media, and economics on sports; and the effects of sports on the world.

Mock Trial

Course Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing

Course Description:

Mock Trial introduces students to the legal profession and offers them a unique opportunity to be active participants in the legal system. Using the current case materials for the Mock Trial Project written by the Nebraska Bar Foundation, students will learn the basics of courtroom procedures, how to prepare a case and the rules of evidence. Students will be required to attend a trial of the competitive mock trial teams at the Douglas County Courthouse as part of the course requirements. While participation on the competitive mock trial is not a course requirement, students may try out for the team.

Holocaust Awareness and Remembrance

Course Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

Course Description:

The Roman Catholic Church unequivocally repudiated anti-Semitism in Nostra Aetate. This class will help shape the truth about the way we see the Holocaust. The class is a tool to view moral behavior and to educate students about contemporary genocide issues. The objective in the class is to help individuals understand their connection to the Holocaust and how each of us can work proactively to ensure that history does not repeat itself. Our goal will be to inform students of the 21st century, so they can help make the world a better place, free of bigotry, bias, prejudice, and bullying. The course curriculum will consist of the Holocaust Awareness & Remembrance and the Echoes and Reflections Program, developed by the Institute for Holocaust Education (IHE), which was established in Omaha. Holocaust literature and field trips will be included in the class.